discoverynews:

Uniting the Planet for a Journey to Another Star
Former astronaut Mae Jemison (and living legend) will spearhead the audacious 100 Year Starship plan to send mankind on an interstellar adventure.
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discoverynews:

Uniting the Planet for a Journey to Another Star

Former astronaut Mae Jemison (and living legend) will spearhead the audacious 100 Year Starship plan to send mankind on an interstellar adventure.

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the-star-stuff:

There’s more water on Jupiter’s moon Europa than there is on Earth
Based on data acquired by NASA’s Galileo satellite, astronomers think the global oceans sloshing around beneath Europa’s icy exterior are likely 2—3 more voluminous than the oceans here on Earth. Not 2—3 times more proportionally, 2—3 times more in total volume.
Illustration by Kevin Hand (JPL/Caltech), Jack Cook (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Howard Perlman (USGS); Spotted on NASA APOD

the-star-stuff:

There’s more water on Jupiter’s moon Europa than there is on Earth

Based on data acquired by NASA’s Galileo satellite, astronomers think the global oceans sloshing around beneath Europa’s icy exterior are likely 2—3 more voluminous than the oceans here on Earth. Not 2—3 times more proportionally, 2—3 times more in total volume.

Illustration by Kevin Hand (JPL/Caltech), Jack Cook (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Howard Perlman (USGS); Spotted on NASA APOD

expose-the-light:

Sun’s Twin Discovered — the Perfect SETI Target?

There are 10 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy that are the same size as our sun. Therefore it should come as no surprise that astronomers have identified a clone to our sun lying only 200 light-years away.

Still, it is fascinating to imagine a yellow dwarf that is exactly the same mass, temperature and chemical composition as our nearest star. In a recent paper reporting on observations of the star — called HP 56948 — astronomer Jorge Melendez of the University of San Paulo, Brazil, calls it “the best solar twin known to date.”

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jtotheizzoe:

Outer Space. The View From Cassini and Voyager

Jaw ————> Floor.

If Rocky Balboa was an aspiring astronomer, this is what he would watch every morning to get pumped up instead of running up that damned staircase.

Sander van den Berg has assembled a plethora of images from the Cassini and Voyager missions, in their “raw” black and white, to create this simple, awe-inspiring and sometimes haunting tour through near outer space.

I know I’ve been heavy on the space stuff lately, but with videos like these sending my brain flying out the back of my head how can I not post it?!?!? :)

(by Sander van den Berg)

itsfullofstars:

Russia plans to regain world leadership in space and remain among the top three space powers, a draft of a space exploration strategy until 2030 submitted to the government by the country’s Federal Space Agency Roscosmos says.  

The draft strategy has not been unveiled to the public. Some information has been leaked to the media, allowing us to assume that the new strategy is very ambitious.

Keep reading.

itsfullofstars:

Disney’s “Mars and Beyond”

discoverynews:

How to Watch the Mars Close-Up This Weekend
February’s spectacular planetary show continues. After Venus and  Jupiter lined  up in the night sky last week, the distance between Earth and Mars  is now shrinking to its smallest in more than two years.
On March 3 Mars will be in opposition to the sun, providing excellent  opportunities for viewing the Red Planet.
The celestial event known as Mars  opposition occurs whenever Earth passes between the sun and the Red  Planet, approximately once every two years and two months. This makes  Mars visible opposite the sun in the Earth’s sky, which is a great time  to view the Red planet because the sun’s rays illuminate the full face  of Mars. Because the two planets’ orbits regularly bring them close  together, it also provides a good time to launch Mars missions such as  the recent Mars  Science Laboratory.
Mars and Earth will actually be at their closest on March 5, so you  have a decent chance to catch the Red Planet anytime in the next few  weeks.
How to Watch
To spot Mars with your naked eye, look for a bright orange-red dot  in the eastern sky shortly after the sun sets. The planet, which can be  distinguished from stars because it doesn’t twinkle, will rise to its highest  position in the southern sky around midnight.
Those with a modest-sized telescope should have good views of Mars’  surface features, including its white polar caps.
Anyone without access to a telescope can catch a live feed of the  opposition event from the Slooh Space Camera on March 3 starting at 8:00 p.m.  PST. Come back tomorrow evening to our site for an embedded video from  Slooh. The Slooh show will feature commentary by the organization’s  Patrick Paolucci, Astronomy Magazine columnist Bob Berman, and  some special guests.
keep reading at Wired
Image: An image of Mars during opposition taken with the world’s  best telescope, Hubble, in 2001. NASA/ESA  and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA

discoverynews:

How to Watch the Mars Close-Up This Weekend

February’s spectacular planetary show continues. After Venus and Jupiter lined up in the night sky last week, the distance between Earth and Mars is now shrinking to its smallest in more than two years.

On March 3 Mars will be in opposition to the sun, providing excellent opportunities for viewing the Red Planet.

The celestial event known as Mars opposition occurs whenever Earth passes between the sun and the Red Planet, approximately once every two years and two months. This makes Mars visible opposite the sun in the Earth’s sky, which is a great time to view the Red planet because the sun’s rays illuminate the full face of Mars. Because the two planets’ orbits regularly bring them close together, it also provides a good time to launch Mars missions such as the recent Mars Science Laboratory.

Mars and Earth will actually be at their closest on March 5, so you have a decent chance to catch the Red Planet anytime in the next few weeks.

How to Watch

  • To spot Mars with your naked eye, look for a bright orange-red dot in the eastern sky shortly after the sun sets. The planet, which can be distinguished from stars because it doesn’t twinkle, will rise to its highest position in the southern sky around midnight.
  • Those with a modest-sized telescope should have good views of Mars’ surface features, including its white polar caps.
  • Anyone without access to a telescope can catch a live feed of the opposition event from the Slooh Space Camera on March 3 starting at 8:00 p.m. PST. Come back tomorrow evening to our site for an embedded video from Slooh. The Slooh show will feature commentary by the organization’s Patrick Paolucci, Astronomy Magazine columnist Bob Berman, and some special guests.

keep reading at Wired

Image: An image of Mars during opposition taken with the world’s best telescope, Hubble, in 2001. NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA

discoverynews:

Space Elevator, Going Up
A Japanese company plans to build an elevator to outer space by 2050.
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discoverynews:

Space Elevator, Going Up

A Japanese company plans to build an elevator to outer space by 2050.

keep reading